Monday, December 17, 2012

milk paint & clear coats

A few weeks ago I finished my first milk paint pieces and I mentioned that I loved working with it.  It's the closed thing to a magical no-fail paint for anyone who wants to try their hand at refinishing.


Wax is generally used as a finish coat for milk paint and while I'm a fan of the paint, I'm not a big fan of wax.  I'm all about the hardest, most durable, long term finish and opted to use oil based poly instead.  (I know there are many devoted wax users out there - this is just my preference).

Instead of wax, I went with this oil based poly - hard, water proof and very durable.

The directions say this product is for spraying or brushing, but I reeeally like wiping it on.
Dip a lint free rag in the can and wipe away.

 See the difference of the richness of the paint in the drawers below...


Remember the table I refinished for 4 men and a lady last year? (Still my most difficult undertaking to date!  I can't tell you how many break downs Zac had to endure during that one :/).  I used the same wipe on method with amazing results and the same product, only tinted.  (I went over making your own DIY poly-stain here).


Most oil-based clear coats have an amber tint to them so I wouldn't recommend using them with lighter paints.  Go with a water based poly instead - I really like Benjamin Moore's Stays Clear.   Water based polys dry faster and don't have the same "open workable" time.  Because of this,  I wouldn't recommend wiping it on - spraying or brushing would be best.

And the finished dresser after two thin coats of poly...

Tomorrow, I'll go over how I finished the green milk paint dresser!

PS  Did I offend any of you devout wax users out there?  :)

17 comments:

  1. I'm not a big fan of wax either. Thanks for sharing your experience with using a poly top coat. It might be something I try sometime. Would this poly also work over chalk paint?

    Allison

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, if you're trying to seal it permanently - and prob not if you were wanting to still write on the chalkboard.

      Delete
  2. Beautiful! I have yet to try the milk paint but I am a huge lover (and user) of chalk paint. I do still use wax occasionally because I do like the finish on some pieces. BUT, I use poly all the time, either oil based or water based depending on the situation. It's just so easy. And like you said, seals it really well.
    I am past due to try the milk paint! Need to get with it. ;)
    Nancy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You'll love it. I haven't used chalk paint yet, but I'm anxious to so I can compare.

      Delete
  3. I am an avid wax user but looking for something easier and more durable as well. I am always concerned it will give the piece a more shiny look. What kind of sheen did you end up with?
    Thanks!
    Francine

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a very subtle sheen - a little more than wax, but not much.

      Delete
  4. Your pieces never cease to amaze me. Your work is so inspiring!

    As far as my table...for sure the amazing job you did has held up and it still looks as good today as it did the day you brought it back to me...even with a house full of four men. I cringed when I read it is still your hardest job to date. Seriously, I feel SOOOO bad it gave you such a headache...although I get because we tried our hand at it and it didn't turn out an ounce as good as the job you did. What can I say but you're the best at what you do!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You know the projects that are the hardest, push you to learn and grow the most. I learned sooo many things while working on this table that have served me time and time again! If I had to do it all over again - I would absolutely do it!!!

      And thanks. :)

      Delete
    2. Hi Nathy,I love this color paint,I mostly preferred light color.Most of my project are draw with this type of color.I enjoy her.

      Delete
  5. I would caution anyone to use nitrile or rubber gloves with any paint, stain, or poly, but ESPECIALLY the oil-based stuff....I was surprised to see your bare hands on the rag for wiping on the poly! I'm a painter, so part of it is exposure over time, but all of it seeps into your skin so really, gloves are the way to go.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! A great reminder. I'm great about being cautious about inhaling solvent fumes, but I'm not great about protecting my skin.

      Delete
  6. how did you go about distressing it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I used an orbital sander with 150 grit sandpaper.

      Delete